Back to School IEP Help

Back to School IEP Help


As you and your child await the beginning of a new school year, now is the time to review your child’s IEP and determine whether the IEP proposed at the IEP meeting held last school year is appropriate for the new school year.   Children, especially younger children, can transform during the summer; physical development, new experiences and opportunities to engage with other children during the summer can significantly impact a child. Before your child begins school, carefully review his/her IEP and determine whether changes are in order.

If you believe revisions should be made, clearly identify concrete examples of how your child has changed. For example, stating, “My child is talking more” is not as helpful as, “This summer, my son starting using adjectives to describe things. I made a list of the ones I have heard him use and I will provide you a copy.” You should also identify what specific changes you are seeking.

Asking for “better goals” or “more services” will leave school staff confused, whereas, asking that a goal be developed in a certain area or that your child receive a particular service will allow your requests due consideration. A school district must provide a detailed response to parental requests to a change an IEP. If the changes are simple, you may be able to make those changes through an IEP Amendment without the necessity of a meeting. However, you are always better served to make a written request for an IEP meeting and cancel the meeting if it is not needed rather than request a meeting at the last minute. In California, a school district is required to convene an IEP meeting within 30 days of receiving a written parental request for an IEP meeting (prolonged periods where school is not in session generally do not count towards those 30 days). Ca. Ed. Code §56343.5.


If parents find that changes in their child warrant changes to their child’s IEP, they should not hesitate to make their concerns and requests known to their school district. (One way to determine whether changes need to be made to the IEP is to mentally walk through the child’s school day to visualize how the child is doing across a wide array of settings, activities and events, and see whether the IEP provides the appropriate level of support for the child.) If you request an IEP meeting, prepare well for the meeting. Carefully review the IEP so you can specifically focus on your areas of concern. If you have documented information that your child has changed, provide it to the IEP team. Parents are also permitted to bring anyone they believe may have “knowledge or special expertise” regarding their child to the IEP meeting. Ca. Ed. Code §56341(b)(6).


  • How has my child’s performance across activities, settings and events changed?
  • Are the components of the IEP prepared last school year appropriate for the new school year?
  • Should I request an IEP meeting to make changes to the IEP?
  • What documentation can I provide that will demonstrate the changes in my child and/or how the IEP should be changed?
  • Are there professionals or other individuals with specialized knowledge regarding my child that I should invite to the IEP meeting?

Michael E. Jewell graduated from Brigham Young University Law School and has been a practicing attorney for more than twenty years. He may be contacted by calling (714)-978-0110, emailing or on the web at

He has represented parents of children with all types of disabilities from autism through specific learning disability and traumatic brain injury and has represented parents in IEP meetings throughout the State of California. He has presented to both parent groups and professional groups. He has represented families at mediation, in due process hearings and in the United States District Court. Mr. Jewell has argued before the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Mr. Jewell is married and the father of three children. He lived in Argentina for two years and is fluent in Spanish.

IEP Advocacy: Annual Goals and Legal Lingo

IEP Advocacy: Annual Goals and Legal Lingo

Walking into an IEP is nerve-wracking. You’re thinking about what goals your child needs, the services that are essential, and the staff that will be most resistant to working with you.  In fact, many parents are highly focused on the services that will be provided and lose sight of the purpose of the annual goals.  Too often, parents readily breeze through goals in order to get to the meat of the IEP – placement and services. Similarly, parents often know why they want services, and they know their child’s unique needs, but they aren’t as versed in how the law obligates the District to provide the services.  Using the right language can avoid common pitfalls that allow a District to reduce or eliminate services.

Annual Goals


The most important thing to remember about the goals is that they are annual goals.  Making sure you have goals in all areas of need and that they are measurable is important, too.  But none of that matters if the District sets the bar so low that any student could achieve the goal.

When thinking about goals, it’s important to consider where you want your child to be a year from now.  Often, a school district will propose a goal that merely works on the next logical step, rather than where the child should be in a year.  For example, I had one case where a young child had mastered single digit addition.  The school district’s proposal? Addition of two digit numbers. While that is a worthy objective, it should not be an annual goal.  If a child who can already do single digit addition spends all year and only learns that same skill with two numbers, rather than learning to subtract or multiply, it can hardly be said that he has made meaningful progress.

One tactic to think about is what other kids will be learning in his or her grade level.  If your child is in second grade now, he or she will be a third grader at the next annual.  So what does a typical third grader learn?  Even if your child is a grade level behind, you want them to make meaningful progress.  So if they are at the first grade level now, you want to at least shoot for a second grade level goal.  Tying annual goals to grade levels is a good way to ensure that progress will be made.

Legal Lingo


When it comes to services, you should be aware of what the law requires – and what it doesn’t.  Legally, the District must provide sufficient services for your child to get “some educational benefit” or “some meaningful benefit” from the education.  In other words, it has to be enough for your child to make progress on goals.  Some courts have compared it to a high school student progressing with about a C average.

Federal law, and the courts agree, does not require “best” services or services that would “maximize a child’s potential.”  If you go in asking for the “best,” the District might even agree that what you are asking for is best, but will be well within its right to cut those services down.  Instead, ask for what you want, but call them “appropriate” services.  Anything less is “inappropriate.”  While those words won’t magically sway the District, they will keep you from falling into the common parental pitfall of asking for the “best” – and then being promptly denied.




Drew Massey


Drew Massey, Esq.  graduated magna cum laude from Pepperdine Law School in 2006.  Since that time, he has represented children and families with special needs in obtaining the necessary services so children can learn.   You can reach him at  (714) 698-0239 or email him at: or visit the Adams & Associates, APLC website at: